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HIV associated cytomegalovirus retinitis in Melbourne, Australia
  1. C L Cherry,
  2. A M Mijch,
  3. J F Hoy,
  4. A J H Hall,
  5. M E Hellard,
  6. M Bryant,
  7. B DeGraaff,
  8. C K Fairley
  1. Department of Infectious Diseases, The Alfred Hospital, Victoria, Australia
  2. Department of Ophthalmology, The Alfred Hospital
  3. Department of Infectious Diseases, The Alfred Hospital, Victoria, Australia and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
  4. Department of Infectious Diseases, The Alfred Hospital, Victoria, Australia
  5. Department of Infectious Diseases, The Alfred Hospital, Victoria, Australia and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
  1. Catherine Cherry, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Rd, Prahran 3181, Victoria, Australia katec{at}netspace.net.au

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Editor,—We report the results of a 12 year review of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in Melbourne, Australia.

We conducted a retrospective review of all HIV infected patients diagnosed with CMV retinitis at Fairfield Hospital and the Alfred Hospital between 1984 and 1996, aiming to identify factors at diagnosis of CMV retinitis which were predictive of outcome. Both hospitals had the same protocol for the treatment of CMV retinitis and employed 3 monthly ophthalmological screening of all HIV infected patients with CD4 counts of less than 50 ×106/l.

The study outcomes were visual loss and death. Moderate visual loss was defined as a visual acuity of less than 6/12 in the better eye, and severe visual loss as visual acuity of less than 6/60 in the better eye (this is legal blindness in Australia).

CMV retinitis was diagnosed in 212 of 1281 patients (16.5%) with AIDS over the study period. As of June 1998, 193 (93%) had died, at a median time of 36 weeks (range 0–192) from CMV diagnosis. Seventy four patients (35%) developed moderate visual loss at a median time of 23 weeks (range 0–163) and 30 patients (14%) developed severe visual loss at a median time of 35 weeks (range 0–120) from diagnosis of CMV retinitis.

The presence of visual symptoms at diagnosis of CMV retinitis was predictive of the development of moderate visual loss (relative risk 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.1–4.2). Fifty eight of 138 patients (42%) with visual symptoms at diagnosis developed moderate visual loss, compared with 16 of 64 patients (25%) who were asymptomatic at diagnosis (p=0.02). The presence of visual symptoms at diagnosis was not predictive of the development of severe visual loss, or early death (p>0.2). Other factors measured at diagnosis of CMV retinitis included the patients' age, CD4 count, weight, visual acuity, and the presence of any previous AIDS defining condition. None of these was associated with the development of visual loss or early death (p>0.1).

The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in a reduction in the incidence of new diagnoses of opportunistic infections. Prolonged survival times with CMV retinitis have been demonstrated in patients who achieve immunological recovery with HAART.1, 2 The ability to predict those patients who are at highest risk of visual loss may assist in advising those who may reasonably cease maintenance therapy for CMV retinitis following immune restoration. An understanding of the natural history of CMV retinitis in the pre-HAART years remains important in managing patients who are failing HIV therapy.

The only factor measurable at diagnosis of CMV retinitis that was predictive of outcome was the presence of visual symptoms. The use of routine ophthalmological screening in HIV infected individuals with low CD4 counts aims to detect CMV retinitis before visual symptoms occur. It is possible that visual loss may be prevented by detecting disease before retinal damage occurs. A prospective evaluation is needed to confirm this finding.

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