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Sex Transm Infect 77:248-254 doi:10.1136/sti.77.4.248

The interrelation of HIV, cervical human papillomavirus, and neoplasia among antenatal clinic attenders in Tanzania

  1. Philippe Mayaud1,2,
  2. Dilbinder K Gill3,
  3. Helen A Weiss1,
  4. Evelyn Uledi4,*,
  5. Lilian Kopwe4,
  6. James Todd1,5,
  7. Gina ka-Gina2,
  8. Heiner Grosskurth1,2,
  9. Richard J Hayes1,
  10. David CW Mabey1,
  11. Charles J N Lacey3
  1. 1London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
  2. 2African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF), Mwanza, Tanzania
  3. 3Section of Infectious Diseases Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, London, UK
  4. 4Regional Medical Office, Mwanza, Tanzania
  5. 5National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR), Mwanza, Tanzania
  1. Philippe Mayaud, Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK philippe.mayaud{at}lshtm.ac.uk
  • Accepted 15 February 2001

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the prevalence and interrelation of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), HIV, and other reproductive tract infections (RTIs) among urban antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza, Tanzania.

Methods: Genital swabs were collected from 660 pregnant women and tested for a range of RTIs and for cervical cytology. Cervical HPV-DNA was detected by PCR and genotyped. HIV and syphilis serologies were performed.

Results: HPV prevalence was 34% (209/612 women). Of the 144 typeable samples, 83% were high risk (HR-HPV) oncogenic strains (56% HPV 16 related types). SIL was detected in 43 women (7%), with high grade SIL in 3%. There was a high prevalence of HIV (15%), and of any RTI (83%). Genital warts were detected in 20 women (3%). HPV infection was associated with some behavioural factors (short duration of relationship, single status, not using condoms) and gonorrhoea. There was no overall association between HPV and HIV (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.6–1.6), but a non-significant trend towards a stronger association with HR-HPV in women aged 15–19 (OR=2.79, 95% CI 0.8–9.5) and women aged ≥30 (OR=3.20, 95% CI 0.7–15). SIL was associated with HPV (OR=3.66, 95% CI 1.9–7.0), but not significantly with HIV (OR=1.54, 95% CI 0.7–3.4). Prevalence of SIL was higher among women dually positive for HPV/HIV compared to HPV infection only (21% v 12%), although this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.17).

Conclusions: HPV infection was highly prevalent in this young antenatal population. The association of HIV with HR-HPV types in older women may suggest that the principal HIV/HPV interaction in this population is for HIV to upregulate HPV persistence, leading to subsequent development of SIL.

Footnotes

  • * Died April 2000