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Moving partner notification into the mainstream of routine sexual health care
  1. Claudia Estcourt,
  2. Lorna Sutcliffe
  1. Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK; c.s.estcourt@qmul.ac.uk
  1. Correspondence to:
 Claudia Estcourt
 Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Newark St, Whitechapel, London, E12AT, UK: c.s.estcourt{at}qmul.ac.uk

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The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) recently published important, evidence-based guidance on one-to-one interventions to reduce the transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).1 Not only does this highlight that one of our core specialty functions is of major importance to public health, but it also challenges us to implement partner notification in more effective and innovative ways. The evidence base for the recommendations comes from a systematic review of effectiveness in partner notification, including methods to improve patient referral,2 the most commonly used and preferred method.3

The recommendations emphasise that assisting patients with STIs to get their partners tested and treated is an essential element of patient care, irrespective of the healthcare setting. Raising the profile of this part of STI care to non-specialists could, in itself, improve outcomes of partner notification. The …

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