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Sex Transm Infect 84:202-206 doi:10.1136/sti.2007.028324
  • Behaviour

Determinants of consistent condom use among female commercial sex workers in the Democratic Republic of Congo: implications for interventions

  1. P K Kayembe1,
  2. M A Mapatano1,
  3. A F Busangu1,
  4. J K Nyandwe1,
  5. G M Musema1,
  6. J P Kibungu1,
  7. D K Mashinda1,
  8. L T Matamba1,3,
  9. G M Mayala2
  1. 1
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Kinshasa School of Public Health, Kinshasa School of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
  2. 2
    Family Health International, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
  3. 3
    Programme National d’approvisionnement en médicaments, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
  1. P K Kayembe, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Kinshasa School of Public Health, Kinshasa School of Medicine, University of Kinshasa, BP 11850 Kinshasa 1, Democratic Republic of Congo; patkayembe{at}yahoo.fr
  • Revised 20 November 2007
  • Published Online First 30 November 2007

Abstract

Objective: To identify correlates of consistent condom use among commercial sex workers (CSW) over a four-week period.

Methods: A total of 2638 CSW selected in all the provincial capital cities in the Democratic Republic of Congo using the time location sampling technique were interviewed to collect information on sociodemographic data, sexual history and behaviour, consumption of intoxicants (alcohol and drugs), knowledge of condoms, their accessibility and the pattern of their use over a four-week period, and exposure to HIV/AIDS prevention services.

Results: 40% (95% CI 38.1 to 41.8) of the CSW have used condoms consistently and this pattern differed according to the category of sexual partners (61.4% in the case of paying partners and 38.2% in the case of non-paying partners). Consistent condom use was associated with age, those aged 20–44 years were more likely to be consistent users (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.69), having cited it as a prevention means for HIV (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2.09 to 3.96), less time in commercial sex work, higher number of clients (OR 3.83, 95% CI 2.95 to 4.96), exposure to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT; OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.70 to 2.42), and access to condoms (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.82).

Conclusions: The risk perception bias associated with non-paying partners, time as a commercial sex worker and age should be taken into account when planning interventions targeting CSW. Access to condoms and VCT should be improved because they are likely to impact on behaviour.

Footnotes

  • Contributions: PKK was the principal investigator, designed the study, prepared and revised the study instruments, supervised data collection, analysed the data and drafted the manuscript. AMM, AFB, JKN, GMM, JPK, DKM, GMM and LTM supervised data collection and contributed to the manuscript preparation.

    Ethical approval was obtained from the Kinshasa School of Public Health Internal Review Board.

  • Funding: The current research was supported by local offices of Family Health International (FHI), The Centers for Diseases Control (CDC), The Global Fund and the Belgian Technical Cooperation (BTC) in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

  • Competing interests: None.