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Application of cumulative odds logistic model on risk factors analysis for sexually transmitted infections among female sex workers in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan province, China
  1. H Wang1,
  2. N Wang1,
  3. A Bi2,
  4. G Wang2,
  5. G Ding1,
  6. M Jia3,
  7. L Lu3,
  8. K Smith1
  1. 1
    National Center for AIDS/STD Prevention and Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, PR China
  2. 2
    Kaiyuan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Kaiyuan, Yunnan, PR China
  3. 3
    Department of AIDS, Yunnan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Yunnan, PR China
  1. Dr N Wang, National Center for AIDS/STD Prevention and Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Beijing 100050, PR China; wangnbj{at}163.com

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections (STI) among female sex workers (FSW) in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan province, China, and to identify risk factors associated with STI.

Methods: A cross-sectional study of 737 FSW was carried out from March to May 2006, with confidential interviews and laboratory tests for STI. A cumulative logit model was used to evaluate the risk factors for STI.

Results: The overall prevalence of HIV is 10.3%. The prevalence of syphilis, herpes simplex virus type 2, gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomonas was 7.5%, 68.1%, 8.3%, 25.9% and 10.6%, respectively. In multivariate cumulative odds logistic analysis, the factors associated with STI were education level, living in the entertainment location, injection drug use, non-injection drug use, over five clients in the previous week and inconsistent use of condoms with clients.

Conclusion: The findings highlight the gravity of the STI epidemic among FSW in China, where sexual transmission has now overtaken unsafe injection practices as the dominant mode of HIV transmission. Targeted intervention programmes for FSW should focus on increasing condom use, strengthening knowledge and awareness of STI/HIV and encouraging routine screening and treatment-seeking behaviours. Reducing the spread of STI also has profound implications for the prevention of HIV.

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Footnotes

  • Funding: This study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health (U19 AI51915-05).

  • Competing interests: None.

  • Ethics approval: This study received approval from both the national and local Yunnan institutional review boards.

  • Patient consent: Obtained.

  • Contributors: NW was the principal investigator for the study, HW was the lead author for the paper; NW, HW, GW, GD, MJ and LL contributed to the design of the study; HW performed all the statistical analyses; NW, HW, AB, GW, GD, MJ and LL supervised the conduct of the survey on site and all the authors contributed to the write up.

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