Article Text

PDF
Discrepancies between the self-reporting of STI preventive care and the actual care provided by male doctors to male patients in Karnataka, India
  1. Javier Mignone1,
  2. Reynold Washington2,
  3. B M Ramesh3,
  4. James F Blanchard4,
  5. T Rajaretnam5,
  6. Stephen Moses
  1. 1Department of Family Social Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  2. 2Institute for Population Health and Clinical Research, St John's Medical College, Bangalore, India
  3. 3Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Manitoba, Monitoring and Evaluation, Karnataka Health Promotion Trust, Bangalore, India
  4. 4Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  5. 5Population Research Centre, JSS Institute of Economic Research, Dharwad, Karnataka, India
  6. 6Departments of Medical Microbiology, Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Javier Mignone, Department of Family Social Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, The University of Manitoba, 307 Human Ecology Building, 35 Chancellor's Circle, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada; mignonej{at}ms.umanitoba.ca

Abstract

Objective To examine the discrepancies between the self-reporting of STI preventive care and the actual care provided by male doctors to male patients in several subdistricts of the state of Karnataka, south India.

Methods Of 3376 allopathic medical practitioners (doctors) enumerated, 2846 were contacted in person. Doctors who saw at least five patients with STI a month were then interviewed (814). Further, 451 of these practitioners were visited by a ‘surrogate patient.’ Comparative analyses were conducted of items from the survey questionnaire and from the surrogate patient answer sheet that unambiguously tapped into the same information.

Results Systematic differences in the self-report by the doctors and the report by the surrogate patients were found. For instance, 99% of practitioners reported examining the patients, whereas only 71% of surrogate patients reported being examined. 96% of practitioners reported advising condom use, whereas only 19% of surrogate patients reported receiving this advice. 97% of practitioners reported advising partner treatment, whereas only 10% of surrogate patients reported receiving this advice. Younger practitioners, doctors in rural centres and doctors with STI in-service training were more likely to be discordant in what they self-reported and what surrogate patients reported.

Conclusions The discrepancies between doctor self-reporting and surrogate patient observations bring into question the reliability of practitioner recall, suggesting that the use of self-reporting surveys should be reassessed.

  • STD services
  • HIV
  • prevention
  • primary care
  • health advice

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. JM was supported by a CIHR postdoctoral fellowship. JFB holds a Canada research chair tier II from CIHR. SM was the recipient of a CIHR investigator award.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study was conducted with the approval of St John's Medical College, Bangalore, India.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles

  • Whistlestop tour
    Jackie A Cassell