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There has been a true rise in Neisseria gonorrhoeae but not in Chlamydia trachomatis in men who have sex with men in Dublin, Ireland
  1. Derval Igoe1,
  2. Mary Kelleher2,
  3. Fionnuala Cooney3,
  4. Susan Clarke4,5,
  5. Mick Quinlan5,
  6. Fiona Lyons6,
  7. Margaret Fitzgerald1,7,
  8. Brendan Crowley2
  1. 1 Health Service Executive Health Protection Surveillance Centre, Dublin, Ireland
  2. 2 Laboratory Medicine Directorate, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
  3. 3 Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Dr Steeven's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  4. 4 Department of Genitourinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  5. 5 Gay Men's Health Service, Dublin, Ireland
  6. 6 Department of Genitourinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  7. 7 European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden
  1. Correspondence to Dr Derval Igoe, Health Service Executive Health Protection Surveillance Centre, 25-27, Middle Gardiner Street, Dublin 1, Ireland; derval.igoe{at}hse.ie

Statistics from Altmetric.com

A recent letter from Haidari et al 1 on Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) in men who have sex with men (MSM) in the UK suggests that recent increases are mainly related to increased use of NAATs with testing at extra-genital sites.

In the greater Dublin area (population 1.6 million), surveillance data indicated a marked increase in cases of gonococcal infection (GC) from 2010 to 2012, crude incidence …

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