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Optimizing sexually transmitted infection screening in correctional facilities- San Francisco, 2003-2005
  1. Pennan M Barry (pennanbarry{at}gmail.com)
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; San Francisco Department of Public Health, United States
    1. Charlotte K Kent (charlotte.kent{at}sfdph.org)
    1. San Francisco Department of Public Health, United States
      1. Katherine C Scott (kate.scott{at}sfdph.org)
      1. San Francisco Department of Public Health, United States
        1. Ameera Snell (ameera.snell{at}sfdph.org)
        1. San Francisco Department of Public Health, United States
          1. Joseph Goldenson (joe.goldenson{at}sfdph.org)
          1. San Francisco Department of Public Health, United States
            1. Jeffrey D Klausner (jeff.klausner{at}sfdph.org)
            1. San Francisco Department pf Public Health, United States

              Abstract

              Objectives: Sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening in correctional facilities provides access to persons at high risk for STIs who might not be screened elsewhere. These screening programs are becoming more widespread, but with decreasing funding for STI control, maximizing screening impact has become increasingly important. We aimed to make recommendations about the impact of age- and sex-targeted screening in correctional facilities.

              Methods: We compared the prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhea for January 2003-July 2005 among different age groups of females and males screened in San Francisco correctional facilities; youth detention (12-17 years) and adult jail (18-35 years).

              Results: A total of 16,975 chlamydia tests and 13,443 gonorrhea tests were performed. The age-specific chlamydia test positivity among females aged 12-17, 18-25, and 26-30 years, respectively, was 9.6% (105/1,092), 9.4% (196/2,088), and 6.3% (40/639), compared with 3.3% (100/3,065), 6.2% (400/6,470), and 3.9% (118/3,046) among males. The age-specific gonorrhea test positivity among females in these same age groups was 3.2% (34/1,062), 2.7% (57/2,082), and 2.4% (15/635), compared with 0.7% (7/1,026), 1.2% (67/5,507), and 1.0% (25/2,555) among males. Of the 1,198 STIs identified, 1,020 (85.1%) were treated.

              Conclusions: On the basis of this report and national data, STI control programs with limited funds should prioritize screening females in youth detention first, women aged ≤30 years in adult jail second, and men aged ≤25 years in adult jail third. Males in youth detention should have a lower priority than young adults in jails.

              • Chlamydia trachomatis
              • bacterial
              • gonorrhea
              • prisons
              • sexually transmitted diseases

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