Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Prevalence and risk factors for carcinogenic human papillomavirus infections in rural Rakai, Uganda.
  1. Mahboobeh Safaeian (safaeianm{at}mail.nih.gov)
  1. National Cancer Institute, United States
    1. Mohammad Kiduggavu (mkidugga{at}jhsph.edu)
    1. Johns Hopkins University, United States
      1. Patti E Gravitt (pgravitt{at}jhsph.edu)
      1. Johns Hopkins University, United States
        1. Stephen J Gange (sgange{at}jhsph.edu)
        1. Johns Hopkins University, United States
          1. Joseph Ssekasanvu (joesseka{at}yahoo.co.uk)
          1. Rakai Health Sciences Program and Uganda Virus Research Institute, Uganda
            1. Dan Muroka (damurok{at}yahoo.com)
            1. Rakai Health Sciences Program and Uganda Virus Research Institute, Uganda
              1. Marc Sklar (sklarmd{at}aol.com)
              1. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, United States
                1. David Serwada (dserwada{at}infocom.co.ug)
                1. Rakai Health Sciences Program and Uganda Virus Research Institute, Uganda
                  1. Maria J Wawer (mwawer{at}jhsph.edu)
                  1. Johns Hopkins University, United States
                    1. Keerti V. Shah (kvshah{at}jhsph.edu)
                    1. Johns Hopkins University, United States
                      1. Ron Gray (rgray{at}jhsph.edu)
                      1. Johns Hopkins University, United States

                        Abstract

                        Objective: To investigate self-administered vaginal swabs for assessing prevalence and correlates of carcinogenic HPV infection in rural Rakai, Uganda.

                        Methods: 1,003 sexually experienced women enrolled in a community cohort provided self-administered vaginal swab collected at annual, home-based surveys. Carcinogenic HPV prevalence, adjusted odds ratios (AOR), 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), and associated risk factors were determined.

                        Results: Carcinogenic HPV prevalence was 19.2%; 46.6% among HIV-positive, 14.8% among HIV-negative women (p<0.001). Type-specific prevalence ranged from 2.0% (HPV 16 and 52) to 0.2% (HPV31). Age-specific HPV prevalence decreased significantly (p<0.001) among HIV-negatives, however, the decrease among HIV-positive women was not as pronounced (p=0.1). Factors independently associated with carcinogenic HPV infection were HIV (AOR=4.82; 95%CI: 3.10-7.53), age (AOR=4.97; 95%CI: 2.19-11.26 for 15-19 year olds compared to 40+ years), more than 2 sex partners in the past year (AOR=2.21; 95%CI: 1.10-4.43), and self-reported herpes zoster, candidiasis, or tuberculosis (AOR=4.52; 95%CI: 1.01-20.31). Married women were less likely to have prevalent carcinogenic HPV (AOR=0.46; 95%CI: 0.30-0.70).

                        Conclusions: HPV prevalence and correlates measured using self-administered vaginal swabs were similar to studies which use cervical samples. Thus, self-collection can be used as a substitute for cervical specimens, and provide an important tool for research in populations unwilling to undergo pelvic exam.

                        Statistics from Altmetric.com

                        Request permissions

                        If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.