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Urological management of acute epididymo-orchitis in sexually active young men: too great a public health risk?
  1. Joshua T Phillips1,
  2. Dia Giebaly2,
  3. Thomas Gillham3,
  4. Jonathan Goring3,
  5. Shweta Patil4,
  6. D Jeevan5,
  7. Vaibhav Modgil5,
  8. Elizabeth Willets6,
  9. Aniket Deshpande4,
  10. Nadi Jayatilaka3,
  11. Paul Rajjayabun5
  1. 1Department of Urology, City Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham, UK
  2. 2University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke, UK
  3. 3Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  4. 4Sandwell Hospital, West Bromwich, UK
  5. 5Alexandra Hospital, Redditch, UK
  6. 6City Hospital, Birmingham, UK
  1. Correspondence to Mr Joshua T Phillips, 146 Salisbury Road, Moseley, Birmingham B138JZ, UK; joshuatarunp{at}hotmail.com

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Despite overwhelming evidence of the growing public health problem caused by untreated Chlamydia trachomatis,1 it remains a problem largely ignored by the urological fraternity. It is the most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) in Europe, and the commonest cause of epididymo-orchitis in sexually active young men.2 Many of these cases present initially to the urologist with suspected testicular torsion, but remain under the urologist once the diagnosis of epididymo-orchitis is made. Clear and specific guidelines for the management of sexually active young men with epididymo-orchitis have been available for over the past decade,3 4 yet surveys suggest many urologists still disregard these recommendations.5 We audited the management of young men with acute epididymo-orchitis by the …

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