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Sex Transm Infect doi:10.1136/sextrans-2011-050289
  • Clinical
  • Short report

Confusion regarding cervical cancer screening and chlamydia screening among sexually active young women

  1. Hope A Ricciotti1,2,3
  1. 1Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  3. 3Dimock Center, Roxbury, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Hope A Ricciotti, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kirstein 315, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; hricciot{at}bidmc.harvard.edu
  1. Contributors OAO: Data acquisition, statistical analysis and interpretation of results, drafting manuscript, approving final version of manuscript. MRH: Conception and design, interpretation of results, critically revising manuscript, approving final version of manuscript. LED: Statistical analysis and interpretation of results, drafting manuscript, approving final version of manuscript. MMP: Conception and design, data acquisition, critically revising manuscript, approving final version of manuscript. HAR: Conception and design, data acquisition, interpretation of results, critically revising manuscript, approving final version of manuscript.

  • Accepted 9 November 2011
  • Published Online First 28 November 2011

Abstract

Objective The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recently recommended that cervical cancer screening begin at 21 years of age and occur biennially for low-risk women younger than 30 years. Earlier studies suggested that women may have limited understanding of the differences between cervical cancer screening and chlamydia screening. This study assessed the knowledge of chlamydia and cervical cancer screening tests and schedules in younger women.

Methods A survey regarding knowledge of chlamydia and cervical cancer screening was administered to 60 younger women aged 18–25 years in an obstetrics and gynaecology clinic at an urban community health centre.

Results The majority of respondents recalled having had a Pap smear (93.3%) or chlamydia test (75.0%). Although many respondents understood that a Pap smear checks for cervical cancer (88.3%) and human papillomavirus (68.3%), 71.7% mistakenly believed that a Pap smear screens for chlamydia. No respondent correctly identified the revised cervical cancer screening schedule, and 83.3% selected annual screening. Few respondents (23.3%) identified the annual chlamydia screening schedule and 26.7% were unsure.

Conclusion Many younger women in an urban community health centre believed that cervical cancer screening also screens for chlamydia and were confused about chlamydia screening schedules. As there is limited knowledge of the revised ACOG cervical cancer screening guidelines, there is a risk that currently low chlamydia screening rates may decrease further after these new guidelines are better known. Obstetrician gynaecologists and primary care providers should educate younger women about the differences between chlamydia and cervical cancer screening and encourage sexually active younger women to have annual chlamydia screening.

Footnotes

  • Funding This work was conducted with support from Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center (NIH Award #UL1 RR 025758 and financial contributions from Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers).

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study was approved by the Committee on Clinical Investigations at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.