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Methods of assessing tubal patency
  1. Anushree Jagadambe1,
  2. Pippa Oakeshott2,
  3. Kamal Ojha3,
  4. Phillip E Hay4
  1. 1Medical student, Population Health Sciences and Education, St George's, University of London, London, UK
  2. 2Reader in General Practice, Population Health Sciences and Education, St George's, University of London, London, UK
  3. 3Consultant Gynaecologist, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St George's Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK
  4. 4Reader in Genitourinary Medicine, Courtyard Genitourinary Medicine Clinic, St George's Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Pippa Oakeshott, Population Health Sciences and Education, St George's, University of London, London SW17 ORE, UK; oakeshot{at}sgul.ac.uk

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Bender and colleagues found that relationships between levels of chlamydia infection and complication rates of pelvic inflammatory disease and ectopic pregnancy between and within countries over time were not straightforward.1 Many women diagnosed with a chlamydial infection are anxious about future fertility. Fertiloscopy is a novel procedure to assess fallopian tube function and may be a suitable alternative to the gold standard diagnostic of laparoscopy.2 It is done under local anaesthesia and may involve transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy, methylene blue dye test, salpingoscopy, microsalpingoscopy and hysteroscopy. The main feature of fertiloscopy is that it allows an optical device to be introduced into the tubal ostium to bilaterally explore the tubal mucosa. Optical magnification …

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