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Teen dating violence perpetration and relation to STI and sexual risk behaviours among adolescent males
  1. Elizabeth Reed1,
  2. Elizabeth Miller2,
  3. Anita Raj1,
  4. Michele R Decker3,
  5. Jay G Silverman1
  1. 1Division of Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA
  2. 2Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
  3. 3Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Elizabeth Reed, Division of Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; lizreed{at}ucsd.edu

Abstract

Objectives To investigate teen dating violence (TDV) perpetration (physical, sexual or psychological violence) and association with STI and related sexual risk behaviours among urban male adolescents.

Methods Adolescent male survey participants (N=134) were aged 14–20 years, recruited from urban health centres. Using crude and adjusted logistic regression, TDV perpetration was examined in relation to self-reported: STI, having sex with another person when they were only supposed to have sex with their main partner, and consistent condom use.

Results Over one-third of males (45%) reported any TDV; 42% reported sexual violence perpetration, 13% reported perpetrating physical violence against a dating/sexual partner and 11% reported psychological violence, including threats of physical or sexual violence. Approximately 15% of males reported having ever had an STI, one quarter reported having sex with another person when they were only supposed to have sex with their main partner and 36% reported consistent condom use (past 3 months). In adjusted logistic regression models, TDV perpetration was significantly associated with self-reports of an STI (OR=3.3; 95% CI 1.2 to 9.2) and having sex with another person when they were supposed to be only having sex with their main partner (OR=4.8; 95% CI 2.0 to 11.4). There was no significant association between TDV perpetration and consistent condom use.

Conclusions Current study findings are the first within the literature on adolescents to suggest that greater STI and sexual risk behaviours among male adolescents perpetrating TDV may be one mechanism explaining increased STI among female adolescents reporting TDV victimisation.

  • Adolescent
  • Sexual Health
  • Public Health

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