Article Text

PDF
Short report
High-risk behaviour and HIV infection risk among non-local men who have sex with men with less than a single year's residence in urban centres: a multicentre cross-sectional study from China
  1. Yan-qiu Yu1,2,
  2. Jun-jie Xu1,2,
  3. Qing-hai Hu1,2,
  4. Hong-Jing Yan3,
  5. Zhe Wang4,
  6. Lin Lu5,
  7. Ming-hua Zhuang6,
  8. Xi Chen7,
  9. Ji-hua Fu8,
  10. Yi-lu Qin9,
  11. Yong-jun Jiang1,2,
  12. Wen-qing Geng1,2,
  13. Hong Shang1,2
  1. 1Key Laboratory of AIDS Immunology of National Health and Family Planning Commission, Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, China
  2. 2Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, China
  3. 3Jiangsu Provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing, China
  4. 4He'nan Provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhengzhou, China
  5. 5Yunnan Provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kunming, China
  6. 6Shanghai Municipal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
  7. 7Hu'nan Provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Changsha, China
  8. 8Shandong Provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Jinan, China
  9. 9University of North Carolina Project-China, Guangzhou, China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Hong Shang, Key Laboratory of AIDS Immunology of National Health and Family Planning Commission, Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, P.R. China; hongshang100{at}hotmail.com

Abstract

Objectives Traditionally, subjects' migration status has usually been defined on the basis of their registered residency status. We attempted to redefine migration based on the duration of residency in their cities of migration and to explore more precisely the impact of migration on HIV infection risk in men who have sex with men (MSM).

Methods A multisite cross-sectional study was conducted during 2012–2013 in seven Chinese cities. Questionnaire surveys were conducted and blood was drawn to test for antibodies to HIV, syphilis and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2). MSM who were unregistered local residents and had resided in their cities of migration for ≤1 or >1 year were defined as migrant MSM, or transitional MSM, respectively.

Results Compared with transitional MSM and local MSM, migrant MSM had poorer HIV knowledge and higher rates of high-risk behaviour, including earlier sexual debut, multiple sexual partners, participation in commercial sex and recreational drug use. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that HIV prevalence among migrant MSM was higher than local MSM (p<0.05). This relationship, however, did not hold for transitional MSM and local MSM (p>0.05). Male sex work, recreational drug use, syphilis infection and HSV-2 infection were independently associated with HIV infection among migrant MSM.

Conclusions Non-local MSM with shorter residence were at greater risk of HIV acquisition. More focus should be placed on HIV behavioural interventions targeting non-local MSM with temporary residence.

  • HIV
  • GAY MEN
  • MIGRATION
  • CHINA
  • SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Y-qY and J-jX contributed equally.

  • Handling editor Jackie A Cassell

  • Contributors Y-qY, J-jX and HS conceived and designed the experiments. Y-qY, J-jX, Q-hH, H-JY, ZW, LL, M-hZ, XC and J-hF performed the study and experiments. Y-qY, J-jX and Q-hH analysed the data. Y-jJ and W-qG contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools. Y-qY, J-jX, Y-lQ and HS wrote and revised the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding The study was funded by the Mega-Projects of National Science Research for the 12th Five-Year Plan (2012ZX10001-006), China-Gates Foundation Cooperation Programme (2012), Liaoning Educational Department Research Project (LZ2014038) and Research project of the first hospital of CMU (FSFH1512).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval The study protocol and content approval were obtained from the Institutional Review Board of the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University (No. [2011]36). Written informed consent for each participant was collected before the initiation of the survey.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.