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Incidence of severe reproductive tract complications associated with diagnosed genital chlamydial infection: the Uppsala Women’s Cohort Study
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  • Published on:
    Chlamydia screening could be harmful
    • Rudiger Pittrof, Consultant in integrated sexual health and HIV
    • Other Contributors:
      • Deirdre Sally

    Dear Editor,

    Low and colleagues used record linkage to identify specific reproductive health outcomes in women who had or have not had a chlamydia test. In their paper they refer to "tests done for any purpose as screening tests". In their analysis they took the "temporal sequence of chlamydia testing and development of consequences" into account. The most important finding of this study was the absence of any...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Chlamydia is still a global perspective
    • Jeevan P Marasinghe, Registrar in Obstetrics and Gynecology,General Hospital( Teaching), Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
    • Other Contributors:
      • Dinuka Lankeshwara.

    Dear Editor,

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the commonest organisms causing pelvic inflammatory disease caused by ascending infections to upper female genital tract from vagina and cervix. It is said to be the most serious infection encountered by females and about one million teenage girls in United states suffer from pelvic inflammatory disease caused by ascending infections including Chlamydia trachomatis.Clini...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Estimates of complications associated with Chlamydia trachomatis need to be refined
    • Ian Simms, Epidemiologist
    • Other Contributors:
      • Macintosh M, Horner P, Emmett L, Clarke J on behalf of the National Chlamydia Screening Programme

    Dear Editor,

    We are seriously concerned by the interpretation Low et al. make from their retrospective cohort study in Uppsala County(1). The study has many methodological issues which may have influenced the findings such as: the use of culture which is probably less than 75% sensitive,(2,3); the exclusion of a fifth (8865) of eligible women in whom information on chlamydia tests and outcome events were availabl...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.