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The challenges of detecting gonorrhoea and chlamydia in rectal and pharyngeal sites: could we, should we, be doing more?
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  • Published on:
    Re:Pharyngeal and Rectal Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis in MSM: Evidence Base

    I thank Dr Alexander for her reply. However I question the assumption that Chlamydia trachomatis is always a pathogen, wherever it is found. Before we embark on what could be a costly programme of screening for C. trachomatis in the throat and the rectum, do we not need some evidence that the detection and treatment of asymptomatic infection in those sites will be associated with clinical benefit in the patients and th...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Pharyngeal and Rectal Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis in MSM: Evidence Base

    Dear Editors,

    Pharyngeal and Rectal Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis in MSM: Evidence Base

    Dr Watson requests the evidence base that screening asymtomatic Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) for C. trachomatis in the throat and the rectum confers either the patient or their contacts any benefit. When considering this question it is important to remember that our current knowledge regarding the natural hi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Evidence, please

    It is a shame that Dr Alexander's opening sentence: "It is important that all men who have sex with men (MSM) accessing sexual health-care are tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) at all anatomical sites where they may be at risk of infection.", is not referenced.

    I should appreciate being directed to the evidence that screening asymtomatic MSM for CT in the throat or rectum confers t...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    The challenge of detecting gonorrhoea (GC) – we can, we should, we already do more.
    • Mrinalini Mahto, Consultant Genitourinary Medicine Dept
    • Other Contributors:
      • Harry Mallinson

    Dear Editor,

    In a recent leading article Alexander (1) citing in particular recent work with men who have sex with men (MSM) in the USA (2), has suggested that when examining extra-genital specimens from high risk patient groups, GC culture should be replaced by GC nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). We agree with this conclusion but believe that the higher sensitivity of GC NAATs should be promoted to allow imp...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.