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P507 Disclosure of same-sex behavior and extragenital STI testing among men who have sex with men — american men’s internet survey
  1. Alex De Voux1,
  2. Kyle Bernstein2,
  3. Robert Kirkcaldy2,
  4. Maria Zlotorzynska3,
  5. Travis Sanchez3
  1. 1CDC, Division of STD Prevention, Atlanta, USA
  2. 2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA
  3. 3Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Atlanta, USA

Abstract

Background Current guidelines recommend that sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM) be screened at least annually for bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STI) at sites of sexual contact regardless of condom use. Extragenital (rectal and pharyngeal) STIs, common among MSM, are mostly asymptomatic and often missed with urethral-only screening. Disclosure of same-sex behaviors by MSM to healthcare providers (HCP) or HCP elicitation of same-sex behaviors through sexual behavioral assessments may facilitate appropriate extragenital STI testing. We describe self-reported prevalence of extragenital STI testing in the past 12 months (p12m) among MSM in the United States stratified by disclosure of same-sex behavior.

Methods Data were obtained from the 2017 American Men’s Internet Survey (AMIS), an annual cross-sectional behavioral internet survey of MSM in the United States. We examined the prevalence of MSM who reported any STI test and an extragenital STI test in the p12m stratified by disclosure of same-sex behavior among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM.

Results Of 10, 049 sexually-active MSM, 42% reported any STI test and 16% reported an extragenital STI test in the p12m. Among HIV-negative MSM, 21% reported an extragenital STI test in p12m; among HIV-positive MSM, 32% reported an extragenital STI test in the p12m. Ever disclosing same-sex behavior was associated with a higher prevalence of extragenital STI testing (PR = 1.68; 95% CI 1.53–1.86) among HIV-negative MSM, but not among HIV-positive MSM (PR = 1.01; 95% CI 0.81–1.25).

Conclusion The prevalence of any STI testing and extragenital STI testing in the p12m among MSM was low. To implement STI recommendations, HCPs must be aware of their patients’ sexual behaviors. Disclosure of same-sex behaviors by MSM to their HCP or elicitation of these behaviors by HCPs through sexual behavioral assessments could increase STI testing, particularly at relevant anatomic sites of exposure.

Disclosure No significant relationships.

  • gay bisexual and other men who have sex with men
  • diagnosis
  • disclosure
  • extragenital

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