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Original research
Improving our understanding of the disproportionate incidence of STIs in heterosexual-identifying people of black Caribbean heritage: findings from a longitudinal study of sexual health clinic attendees in England

Authors

  • Megan Bardsley Health Protection Research Unit in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London, in partnership with Public Health England and in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Institute for Health Research, London, UKNational Infection Service, Blood Safety, Hepatitis & HIV Division, Public Health England, London, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Sonali Wayal Health Protection Research Unit in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London, in partnership with Public Health England and in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Institute for Health Research, London, UKCentre for Population Research in Sexual Health and HIV, University College London, London, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Paula Blomquist Health Protection Research Unit in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London, in partnership with Public Health England and in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Institute for Health Research, London, UKNational Infection Service, Blood Safety, Hepatitis & HIV Division, Public Health England, London, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Hamish Mohammed Health Protection Research Unit in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London, in partnership with Public Health England and in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Institute for Health Research, London, UKNational Infection Service, Blood Safety, Hepatitis & HIV Division, Public Health England, London, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Catherine H Mercer Health Protection Research Unit in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London, in partnership with Public Health England and in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Institute for Health Research, London, UKCentre for Population Research in Sexual Health and HIV, University College London, London, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Gwenda Hughes Health Protection Research Unit in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London, in partnership with Public Health England and in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Institute for Health Research, London, UKNational Infection Service, Blood Safety, Hepatitis & HIV Division, Public Health England, London, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  1. Correspondence to Megan Bardsley, Health Protection Research Unit in Blood Borne and Sexually Transmitted Infections at University College London in partnership with Public Health England, and in collaboration with London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, National Institute for Health Research, London NW9 5EQ, London, UK; megan.bardsley{at}phe.gov.uk
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Citation

Bardsley M, Wayal S, Blomquist P, et al
Improving our understanding of the disproportionate incidence of STIs in heterosexual-identifying people of black Caribbean heritage: findings from a longitudinal study of sexual health clinic attendees in England

Publication history

  • Received September 17, 2020
  • Revised December 16, 2020
  • Accepted December 22, 2020
  • First published January 29, 2021.
  • Supplementary Data

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