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Preferences for chlamydia testing and management in Hong Kong: a discrete choice experiment
  1. Jason J Ong1,2,
  2. Christopher K Fairley1,2,
  3. Jane S Hocking3,
  4. Katy M E Turner4,
  5. Ross Booton4,
  6. Desiree Tse5,
  7. William W C W Wong5,6
  1. 1Central Cllinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  2. 2Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  3. 3Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia
  4. 4School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol University, Bristol, UK
  5. 5Department of Family Medicine & Primary Care, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  6. 6Department of Family Medicine & Primary Care, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jason J Ong, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3053, Australia; jong{at}mshc.org.au

Abstract

Objectives As most chlamydia cases are asymptomatic, regular testing and timely management may be necessary for control. We aimed to determine the preferences of people living in Hong Kong for chlamydia testing and management services.

Methods An online panel of sexually active individuals living in Hong Kong completed the survey with two discrete choice experiments (DCEs). The first DCE examined the preferred attributes of a chlamydia testing service (cost, location, appointment time, speed of results, delivery of results and availability of other STI testing). The second DCE examined the preferred attributes of a chlamydia management service (cost, access to patient-delivered partner therapy, location, travel time, type of person consulted and attitude of staff).

Results In total, 520 individuals participated: average age 36.8 years (SD 9.9), 40% males and 66% had a bachelor’s degree or higher. Choosing to test was most influenced by cost, followed by speed of results, delivery of results, extra STI testing, appointment available and the least important was the location of testing. Choosing to attend for management was most influenced by staff’s attitude, followed by cost, who they consult, access to patient-delivered partner therapy, travel time and the least important was treatment location.

Conclusion To design effective chlamydia testing and management services, it is vital to respond to patient needs and preferences. For people living in Hong Kong, cost and staff attitude were the most important factors for deciding whether to test or be managed for chlamydia, respectively.

  • testing
  • management
  • chlamydia infections
  • health services research

Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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Data availability statement

All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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Footnotes

  • Handling editor Adam Huw Bourne

  • Twitter @katymeturner

  • Contributors JJO: Conceptualizing, Funding – acquisition, Methodology, Formal analysis, Writing – Original draft. CKF, JSH, KMET, RB: Writing – review & editing. WCW: Conceptualizing, Funding – acquisition, Writing – review & editing.

  • Funding Financial support for this study was provided entirely by a grant from the Hong Kong Medical Research Fund (18171282). The funding agreement ensured the authors’ independence in designing the study, interpreting the data, writing and publishing the report. JJO is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant (GNT1193955). CKF is supported by an NHMRC Leadership Investigator Grant (GNT1172900).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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