eLetters

29 e-Letters

published between 2001 and 2004

  • We need randomised trials to make progress in chlamydia screening in England
    Nicola Low

    Dear Editor,

    In their editorial (Sexually Transmitted Infections 2004;80:331-33) Kevin Fenton and Helen Ward give a positive and detailed overview of the Government's policy on chlamydia screening in England. This could have been balanced by a more critical assessment of the challenges.

    The alarming rise in chlamydia rates in Sweden, where opportunistic screening has been in place nationally since 1988...

    Show More
  • 30 years research of Oriel surname
    Owen J Vaughan

    Dear Editor,

    It is interesting to know that John David Oriel had followed his father George Harold Oriel into Medicine. George has served at Portsmouth Hasler Hospital during the war years. John's fathers' death (2nd May 1939) was published in the London Gazette 18 Aug 1939 when he was living at Heathercliff Langland Swansea although he had previously lived at 19 Carlton Road Sidcup. Medicine was not lost to the...

    Show More
  • Rethinking the roles of professionals in the HIV-outpatient setting - please carry on reflecting?
    Surinder Singh

    Dear Editor

    Dave et al's letter about the role of professionals in the HIV- outpatient setting is aposite and brings up many issues including who should end up doing this type of 'routine' work.[1] As always GPs are called in along with other professionals as possible options. However, communication amongst other problems, continue to be a big challenge.

    I recently reviewed all the notes of the tw...

    Show More
  • Is a test of cure for Trichomonas vaginalis necessary in asymptomatic patients?
    Laura J Waters

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the trichomonas review written by Swygard et al.[1]

    Current BASHH and European STD guidelines for the management of trichomoniasis state that “tests of cure should be undertaken if the patient remains symptomatic following treatment, or if symptoms recur”.[2,3] No specific recommendations are made for the follow-up of patients who were asymptomatic at presentation. Sw...

    Show More
  • Author's reply
    Tania Crucitti

    Dear Editor

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate five different primer sets described in the literature for the amplification of Trichomonas vaginalis. We therefore used the same working conditions for the five primers sets, i.e. the same extraction method, thermocycler, reagents etc. It was not our aim to re-validate these primer sets.

    For all of the five primer sets we used the AmpliTaq Gold poly...

    Show More
  • Avoiding Stereotyping
    Nkechi Ozuzu

    Dear Editor

    The article on Pathways to HIV testing and care by black African and white patients in London is indeed very interesting.

    However,I do not believe it takes into account the very real differences between the different African communities in London. The severe devastation and scale of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa has not been felt uniformly across the continent.West African countries for whatev...

    Show More
  • Taq Polymerase vs. Ampli Taq Gold Polymerase for Trichomonas vaginalis PCR detection.
    Robert H. Gilman

    Dear Editor

    The article by Crucitti et al.[1] evaluated five PCR techniques for Trichomonas vaginalis including the one published by our group (Mayta et al. [2]). The authors however did not follow the protocol we published and so got results that we consider to be erroneous.

    In our work we used simple Taq polymerase while Crucitti used Taq gold for this purpose. He did this without chang...

    Show More
  • HIV epidemic among Caribbeans in Britain: half-gay or half-straight?
    Ford CI Hickson

    Dear Editor

    Nicola Low [1] is right to highlight the need to consider the number of HIV diagnoses made in Britain in each ethnic group in light of the size of that ethnic group.

    For some years we have been told ad infinitum that the number of diagnoses of heterosexually acquired HIV has ‘out-stripped’ the number of homosexually acquired diagnoses, as if that indicated some kind of equivalence of impa...

    Show More
  • HIV testing: providing information
    Peter G Watson

    Dear Editor

    I agree with Dr Carne that the requirement to offer 90% (next year 100%) of our new patients an HIV test precludes us from offering everyone discussion about the HIV test as recommended by the UK Departments of Health in their Guidelines on HIV Pre-test Discussion.[1] However, the guidelines still include the statement that for, "individuals actively seeking an HIV test for the first occasion, here a...

    Show More
  • Re: Theory and Practice
    Christopher A Carne

    Dear Editor

    I am grateful for Dr Watson's generous comments.

    I agree that presenting an appropriate amount of written information to substitute for an HIV pre-test discussion is problematical. We introduced such a system with some misgivings but felt that it was the only way that we could comply with the Royal College of Physicians second Speciality Specific Standard without seriously disrupting the se...

    Show More

Pages